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The Dumbbell Upright Row




The Dumbbell Upright Row works several of the muscles in your shoulders as well as the triceps
and upper chest.

How to perform:

With a dumbbell in each hand, stand with palms facing front of thighs. Pull dumbbells up to thefront of shoulders with elbows leading out to the sides. Allow your wrists to flex as the dumbbellsrise upward. Lower back down. That’s one rep.

When the dumbbells are raised, your wrists should be in front of or just below your shoulders;
elbows should be to the sides, not too forward.
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The Daily Walk


The daily walk is one of the most simple and most effective ways to lose weight… and not only will it help you to lose weight, it helps to keep weight gain at bay forever. 

This is certainly not a fashionable method for weight loss and in fact, it’s so rarely talked about that I think most people have forgotten that it even exists. 

It’s about getting up 20 to 30 minutes early, putting on your running shoes and hittingthe pavement (or treadmill if you must) for a20 to 30 minutes brisk walk. Keep in mindthat you will be in a fasted state during thistime, so your simple little walk can actuallyproduce some very significant results.

This daily, rapid-paced walk is an integral part of The 3 Week Diet. This walk should be done
every single day upon waking. Understand that this is a fast walk only. It’s not a jog and it’s not arun. Jogging and running can actually slow your progress on this diet. On the other hand, this fastwalk will ignite your metabolism early on and it will actually increase your energy throughoutthe day, in addition to burning fat and increasing catecholamine for added fat mobilization.

To maximize this walk, I recommend drinking an ice-cold glass of water just before you step outthe door. Optionally, if you are taking a “fat-burner” (caffeine/yohimbine hcl) you’ll want to
take it approximately 15-minutes before the walk.
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Exercise when Fasting

Exercise when Fasting



I tend to do my workouts in a fasted state because I want to skyrocket my catecholamine levels and take advantage of the significant increase in growth hormone that comes with fasting, as well as adding to the already “turbocharged” fat-burning that is going on during my fast.
Research has shown that training in a fasted state does not limit your training efforts. In fact, it
allows you to maintain your muscle (and even increase it) while burning loads of body fat.
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Exercise boosts metabolism and burns fat




Exercise boosts metabolism and burns fat. It also lowers insulin and increases catecholamines… and it’s the best way to increase blood flow to adipose tissue and to transport fatty acids out of fat cells.

Exercise helps to burn fat because it requires you to move your muscles. Moving your muscles causes physiological changes that are necessary to maintain and build new muscle mass. Every pound of muscle in your body needs somewhere between 50-100 calories to maintain that muscle mass. And when you consider that fat is burned almost exclusively in your muscle, you can begin to see just how crucial it is to not only maintain the muscle you have, but to build new muscle as well. Simply put, the more muscle you have, the more fat you will burn. Conversely, losing muscle (by lack of exercise) reduces your body's ability to burn fat.

In addition to all the calorie and fat-burning effects, exercise also has the remarkable ability to stimulate fat tissue by increasing blood flow to your fat cells. This makes for easier fat mobilizatio which is especially important to the stubborn fat areas like the hips, thighs, belly and buttocks, where insufficient blood flow is believed to be the cause of “stubborn body fat.” That being said, understand that every time you exercise, you get a ton of fat-burning benefits. But also remember that physical fitness LOVES consistency. Being consistent with your workouts means serious results.

Exercise has a wide range of benefits besides fat burning and better fat mobilization. Exercise also regulates appetite, improves sleep patterns, elevates mood, and increases energy levels and promotes a general feeling of well being. Exercise has also been shown to add years to your life, help you fend off many diseases and keep your body in far better health than those who do not exercise.

A recent study revealed that people on low-carb diets who do not exercise still burn more fat that thoseon low-fat diets who do exercise. And while you will burn more fat on this diet than anything you've ever tried before, we can still take those results and nearly double them with a good exercise program.
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Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s)

Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s)


Your health, good or bad, is driven in large part by the level of inflammation in your body and theamount of lean muscle mass you have. In fact, there are several diseases (including obesity) thatare linked to inflammation and the lack of muscle mass.

When you control the inflammation in your body, you can effectively control the onset of
numerous diseases, including type II diabetes, heart disease, depression, arthritis and obesity.

Muscle mass decreases over time, especially when we are not eating enough protein and not
engaging in exercise. The less muscle mass we have, the more weight we will gain. Lean muscle
mass is crucial to keeping body fat at bay.

A healthy body is one that has low levels of inflammation and higher levels of muscle mass. Whilemany attribute high levels of inflammation and loss of muscle mass to aging, the fact is that wecan keep our bodies young through proper nutrition and exercise. We get old from the inside out.

So, it is important to keep inflammation down and exercise up.
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Fluctuations in Weight loss

Fluctuations in weight loss


After the fourth or fifth day of dieting the daily loss of weight begins to decrease to one pound or somewhat less per day, and there is a smaller urinary output. Men often continue to lose regularly at that rate, but women are more irregular in spite of faultless dieting. There may be no drop at all for two or three days and then a sudden loss which reestablishes the normal average. These fluctuations are entirely due to variations in the retention and elimination of water, which are more marked in women than in men.

The weight registered by the scale is determined by two processes not necessarily synchronized under the influence of HCG. Fat is being extracted from the cells, in which it is stored in the fatty tissue. When these cells are empty and therefore serve no purpose, the body breaks down the cellular structure and absorbs it, but breaking up of useless cells, connective tissue, blood vessels, etc., may lag behind the process of fat-extraction. 

When this happens the body appears to replace some of the extracted fat with water which is retained for this purpose. As water is heavier than fat the scales may show no loss of weight, although sufficient fat has actually been consumed to make up for the deficit in the 500-Calorie diet. When such tissue is finally broken down, the water is liberated and there is a sudden flood of urine and a marked loss of weight. This simple interpretation of what is really an extremely complex mechanism is the one we give those patients who want to know why it is that on certain days they do not lose, though they have committed no dietary error.

Patients, who have previously regularly used diuretics as a method of reducing, lose fat during the first two or three weeks of treatment which shows in their measurements, but the scale may show little or no loss because they are replacing the normal water content of their body which has been dehydrated. Diuretics should never be used for
reducing.
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Vitamins and Anemia


Vitamins and anemia
 


Sooner or later most patients express a fear that they may be running out of vitamins or that the restricted diet may make them anemic. On this score the physician can confidently relieve their apprehension by explaining that every time they lose a pound of fatty tissue, which they do almost daily, only the actual fat is burned up; all the vitamins, the proteins, the blood, and the minerals which this tissue contains in abundance are fed back into the body.

Actually, a low blood count not due to any serious disorder of the blood forming tissues improves during treatment, and we have never encountered a significant protein deficiency nor signs of a lack of vitamins in patients who are
dieting regularly.
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Faulty Dieting



Few patients will take one's word for it that the slightest deviation from the diet has under HCG disastrous results as far as the weight is concerned. This extreme sensitivity has the advantage that the smallest error is immediately detectable at the daily weighing but most patients have to make the experience before they will believe it.

Persons in high official positions such as embassy personnel, politicians, senior executives, etc., who are obliged to attend social functions to which they cannot bring their meager meal must be told beforehand that an official dinner will cost them the loss of about three days treatment, however careful they are and in spite of a friendly and wouldbe cooperative host. We generally advise them to avoid all around embarrassment, the almost inevitable turn of conversation to their weight problem and the outpouring of lay counsel from their table partners by not letting it be known that they are under treatment. They should take dainty servings of everything, bide what they can under the cutlery and book the gain which may take three days to get rid of as one of the sacrifices which their profession entails. Allowing three days for their correction, such incidents do not jeopardize the treatment, provided they do not occur all too frequently in which case treatment should be postponed to a socially more peaceful season.
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Causes of Obesity The Exhaustion of the Fat-bank




But there is still a third way in which obesity can become established, and that is when a presumably normal fatcenter is suddenly (with emphasis on suddenly) called upon to deal with an enormous influx of food far in excess of momentary requirements. At first glance it does seem that here we have a straight-forward case of overeating being responsible for obesity, but on further analysis it soon becomes clear that the relation of cause and effect is not so simple. In the first place we are merely assuming that the capacity of the fat center is normal while it is possible and even probable that the only persons who have some inherited trait in this direction can become obese merely by
overeating.

Secondly, in many of these cases the amount of food eaten remains the same and it is only the consumption of fuel which is suddenly decreased, as when an athlete is confined to bed for many weeks with a broken bone or when aman leading a highly active life is suddenly tied to his desk in an office and to television at home. 
Similarly, when a person, grown up in a cold climate, is transferred to a tropical country and continues to eat as before, he may develop obesity because in the heat far less fuel is required to maintain the normal body temperature.

When a person suffers a long period of privation, be it due to chronic illness, poverty, famine or the exigencies of war, his diencephalic regulations adjust themselves to some extent to the low food intake. When then suddenly these conditions change and he is free to eat all the food he wants, this is liable to overwhelm his fat-regulating center.
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Causes of Obesity - Other Diencephalic Disorders



The second way in which obesity can become established is the lowering of a previously normal fat-banking capacity owing to some other diencephalic disorder. 

It seems to be a general rule that when one of the many diencephalic centers is particularly overtaxed; it tries to increase its capacity at the expense of other centers. In the menopause and after castration the hormones previously produced in the sex-glands no longer circulate in the body. 

In the presence of normally functioning sex-glands their hormones act as a brake on the secretion of the sexgland stimulating hormones of the anterior pituitary. When this brake is removed the anterior pituitary enormously increases its output of these sex-gland stimulating hormones, though they are now no longer effective. In the absence of any response from the non-functioning or missing sex glands, there is nothing to stop the anterior pituitary from producing more and more of these hormones. This situation causes an excessive strain on the diencephalic center which controls the function of the anterior pituitary. In order to cope with this additional burden the center appears to draw more and more energy away from other centers, such as those concerned with emotional stability, the blood circulation (hot flushes) and other autonomous nervous regulations, particularly also from the not so vitally important fat-bank.

The so called stable type of diabetes involves the diencephalic blood sugar regulating center the diencephalon tries to meet this abnormal load by switching energy destined for the fat bank over to the sugar-regulating center, with the result that the fat-banking capacity is reduced to the point at which it is forced to establish a fixed deposit and thus initiate the disorder we call obesity. In this case one would have to consider the diabetes the primary cause of the obesity, but it is also possible that the process is reversed in the sense that a deficient or overworked fat-center draws energy from the sugar-center, in which case the obesity would be the cause of that type of diabetes in which the pancreas is not primarily involved. Finally, it is conceivable that in Cushing's syndrome those symptoms which resemble obesity are entirely due to the withdrawal of energy from the diencephalic fat-bank in order to make it available to the highly disturbed center which governs the anterior pituitary adrenocortical system.

Whether obesity is caused by a marked inherited deficiency of the fat-center or by some entirely different diencephalic regulatory disorder, its insurgence obviously has nothing to do with overeating and in either case obesity is certain to develop regardless of dietary restrictions. In these cases any enforced food deficit is made up from essential fat reserves and normal structural fat, much to the disadvantage of the patient's general health.
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Causes of Obesity - The Inherited Factor


Causes of Obesity - The Inherited Factor




The Inherited Factor

Assuming that there is a limit to the diencephalon's fat banking capacity, it follows that there are three basic ways in which obesity can become manifest. The first is that the fat-banking capacity is abnormally low from birth. Such a congenitally low diencephalic capacity would then represent the inherited factor in obesity. When this abnormal trait is markedly present, obesity will develop at an early age in spite of normal feeding; this could explain why among brothers and sisters eating the same food at the same table some become obese and others do not.

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Injustice to the Obese

Injustice to the Obese


When then obese patients are accused of cheating, gluttony, lack of will power, greed and sexual complexes, the strong become indignant and decide that modern medicine is a fraud and its representatives fools, while the weak just give up the struggle in despair. In either case the result is the same: a further gain in weight, resignation to an abominable fate and the resolution at least to live tolerably the short span allotted to them - a fig for doctors and insurance companies.

Obese patients only feel physically well as long as they are stationary or gaining weight. They may feel guilty, owing to the lethargy and indolence always associated with obesity. They may feel ashamed of what they have been led to believe is a lack of control. They may feel horrified by the appearance of their nude body and the tightness of their clothes. But they have a primitive feeling of animal content which turns to misery and suffering as soon as they make a resolute attempt to reduce. For this there are sound reasons.

In the first place, more caloric energy is required to keep a large body at a certain temperature than to heat a small body. Secondly the muscular effort of moving a heavy body is greater than in the case of a light body. 

The muscular effort consumes calories which must be provided by food. Thus, all other factors being equal, a fat person requires more food than a lean one. One might therefore reason that if a fat person eats only the additional food his body requires he should be able to keep his weight stationary. Yet every physician who has studied obese patients under rigorously controlled conditions knows that this is not true. Many obese patients actually gain weight on a diet which is calorically deficient for their basic needs. There must thus be some other mechanism at work.
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